Course Descriptions

Water and Wastewater Environmental Training
Course Descriptions

Note: Not all of these courses are offered in the current MCET schedule. You are encouraged to contact MCET regarding training you're interested in taking. 

We can offer courses via our open enrollment program, or we may be able to arrange a contract training course for you. 

5 Common-Sense Practices of Well-Run Water/Wastewater Facilities
TRE 4685-09-11:  All Operators (Process)
7 hours
Facility operators must look at both operational and measurement practices needed to achieve a well-run operation.  Participants will explore the two most important measurement parameters an operator can make, but which typically take a back-seat in importance.  In addition, three key operational practices most often ignored in the chemical feed process will be discussed, such as the advantages of always using the weakest possible strength of a chemical that is practical.  Just because one can buy 12% Hypochlorite, or 50% caustic, doesn't necessarily it should be dosed at full strength.

21st Century Drinking Water Corrosion Control
TRE 2720-03-03:  WT All; WD (Process)
7 hours
Effective corrosion control in potable water requires more than water chemistry studies.  This course combines interactive lecture with live demonstrations.  The course will define potable water corrosion, discuss the benefits of determining corrosion indexes, and examine water quality issues like pH, temperature, total dissolved solids, hardness, and alkalinity.  Disinfection (type/residual), distribution piping, flushing schedules, treatment process, coupon studies, and electrical grounding all play a major role in total system corrosion.  Typical corrosion control practices are reviewed, compared, and contrasted.

21st Century Membrane Applications in the Water/Wastewater Process 
TRE 4871-11-03:  All Operators (Process)
7 hours
This program looks at the application and use of membrane technology while addressing the tighter regulatory requirements in both water and wastewater.  Through easy to understand graphics, terrific verbal presentation, and timely demonstrations, learn what common filtration methods look like.  Then we will define the various membranes in use today and see how the technology is being applied in a variety of applications removing, bacteria, protozoa's, viruses, dissolved minerals, toxic elements of water, etc. Next we visit the various types of membranes used.  See how membrane pore size and pressure requirements are inverse of each other.  See how membrane technology today is helping wastewater treatment plants meet enhanced nutrient removal requirements and why wastewater operational modifications are needed to include membranes.

21st Century Principles of Water/Wastewater Chlorination and De-Chlorination 
TRE 4320-08-07:  All Operators (Process)
7 hours
Since the early 1900s, disinfection of municipal wastewater has typically been done through the use of some form of chlorine.  This course looks at the most common mistakes water/wastewater systems make using hypochlorite and liquid based de-chlorinating agents.  Participants will learn why it is so important to accurately measure delivered hypochlorite/de-chlorinating agent strength and their rates of deterioration.  Topics covered will include how valuable simple pump dose calculations can be to minimize and maximize residuals and the importance of verifying all pump settings via routine calibrations.

Activated Sludge - BOD Removal and Nitrification 
TRE 5903-16-05:     All WW; IWW 5, 6, and 7 (Process)
7 hours
This activated sludge process class is designed to help wastewater operators understand the basic operations and control of activated sludge processes. The class will discuss activated sludge process modifications, their advantages and disadvantages, and long term process control. Operators will explore the critical components and microbiology of activated sludge processes, how to develop effective sampling programs and analyze lab results, and how activated sludge processes relate to other wastewater treatment processes.

Activated Sludge Design Criteria and Performance Standards   
TRE 5661-15-03:  WW 3-6 S&A; IWW 3-7 (Process)
7 hours
All operators making process control decisions need to be aware of plant design criteria and regionally recognized performance standards.  This is an important concept even if the plant is performing well.  When upsets occur or you are dealing with seasonal I/I flows, comparing plant operations to design criteria and performance standards is one of the first steps to take when troubleshooting and making corrective process control decisions.  This course is intended for the intermediate to advanced level operator and will focus on utilizing design criteria and performance standards when making process control decisions.  Topics covered include standards and design criteria, key elements of process performance standards, evolution of activated processes, typical hydraulic sizing of BNR treatment components and a problem solving exercise where operators will assume that all or part of the plant's design criteria is not available and will need to use performance standards to develop substitute design criteria for a fictitious activated sludge wastewater treatment plant.

Activated Sludge – Evolution to Nitrogen Removal
TRE 5906-16-05; All WW; IWW 5, 6, and 7 (Process)
7 hours
What do you know about the various activated sludge configurations currently used, available, and evolving for activated sludge, BNR, and ENR processes? The objective of this class is to give activated sludge plant operators a more in-depth understanding of the activated sludge process. With this understanding, effluent quality variability and process energy usage can be reduced. Topics to be presented include: wastewater characterization, biological N & P removal, the importance of sludge quality, measuring and controlling sludge quality, WAS flow control, RAS flow optimization, and secondary clarifier performance diagnostic testing. Specifically, types of aeration diffusers (mechanical, fine bubble, and membranes) and blowers (positive, multistage, single stage, and high speed) will be addressed. The influence of MCRT and MLSS will also be addressed as to the efficiency, ease (or difficulty) and cost of aeration. Finally, helpful operating hints will be provided based on experiences from operating facilities.

Activated Sludge Process Control    
TRE 1176-95-02:  WW 3, 5; IWW 5 (Process)
7 hours
Final effluent quality is largely dependent on the composition of the biomass in an activated sludge plant.  This course is designed to review the principles of biologically treating wastewater with activated sludge, defining and examining traditional process control tests, performing and interpreting each test, and recording test results.  Participants will be introduced to testing techniques for detailed microscope biomass examination; food to mass ratio; mean cell residence time; sludge age; settleability; sludge volume index; oxygen uptake rate; and sludge blanket depth.  Each participant should bring a calculator to this class.  Class size is limited to 15 participants. 

Advanced Disinfection Technologies for Water/Wastewater Operations
TRE 6218-17-08: All WW; IWW; All WT; WD (Process)
7 hours
With all the concerns related to applied standard chlorination, operators and superintendents are looking for ways to maintain disinfection capability yet reduce overall byproducts, system vulnerability, and safety and security. This program looks at emerging disinfection technologies, their applications in both water and wastewater, and their comparative utilization to kill and inactivate bugs, reduce byproducts, and maintain system integrity. Operators will examine the practice of chloramination, chlorine dioxide, peracetic acid applications, and other oxidation processes like UV/hydrogen peroxide and Fenton's Reaction to maintain disinfection and operations capabilities without the typical issues associated with standard chlorination. We will look to case histories to see hardware needed, chemical dosing requirements, and cost factors and see what it takes to put these alternatives to chlorine to work.

Aeration of Activated Sludge, BNR, and ENR Processes
TRE 4855-10-12:  WW All; IWW All; Superintendents WW & IWW (Process)
7 hours
Various technologies are used to aerate activated sludge processes, including Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) and Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) processes.  Various aeration options currently used, available, and evolving for activated sludge, BNR and ENR processes will be covered in this course.  Specifically, types of aeration diffusers (mechanical, fine bubble, and membranes) and blowers (positive, multistage, single stage, and high speed) will be addressed.  The influence of MCRT and MLSS will also be addressed as to the efficiency, ease (or difficulty) and cost of aeration.  Airflow rate requirements and their calculations will be discussed in depth.  Diffuser fouling and scaling issues will be discussed.  Finally, helpful operating hints will be provided based on experiences from operating facilities.

Alternative Energy Sources for Water and Wastewater Facilities
TRE 4791-10-05:  All Operators  (Non-Process)
7 hours
Soaring costs have made finding and using alternate energy sources important. These sources are renewable and are thought to be "free" energy sources.  Alternative energy is the use of non-conventional energy sources to generate power.  This course provides a comprehensive overview of renewable energy options used in water and wastewater facilities.  Topics include:  solar energy, wind power, hydropower, fuel cells, biomass, and tidal energy options related to environmental and economic impact.  This class will discuss those choices that you can make today to make a difference.

Annual Refresher - The Safe Operator
TRE 4094-07-09:  All Operators, All Superintendents  (Non-Process)
7 hours
Employers are required, under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) safety standards to conduct annual safety training for their employees.  The safety training content is determined by the nature of the organization’s duties, tasks, and functions required of their employees.  Participants will discuss case studies facilitated by the instructor and review the OSHA standard 29 CFR 1926 and 29 CFR 1910 in the following areas: confined space entry, respiratory protection, lockout/tagout and excavation safety.

Applied Mathematics 
TRE 5801-15-11:  All Operators (Process)
14 hours
This course is designed to provide operators with problem solving mathematical skills specific to the water and wastewater industry.  Practical problem solving topics will include conversion formulas, direct proportions, area calculations, and volume calculations. Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to select correct conversion values for conversion formulas; solve for one unknown; set up equations for work-related work problems; and calculate operational problems, such as flow quantity, effluent treatment and sludge volume.  It is recommended that operators have completed a basic mathematics course as a pre-requisite.

Applied Process Mathematics
TRE 6026-16-11: All Operators (Process)
7 hours
Operators often have to use higher level mathematical formulas to perform their day to day work functions. This course will build on mathematical concepts taught in Introduction to Applied Process Mathematics and is designed to provide operators with problem solving skills specific to the water and wastewater industry. Participants will practice manipulating formulas for unknown variables, analyze operational problems using math skills, and review math skills necessary for certification exams. Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to calculate operational problems such as flow quantity, effluent treatment and sludge volume.

Apprentice Well Driller Exam Prep
TRE 4947-11-06:  WT All; WD (Non-Process)
6 hours
This one-day course is designed to help prepare well drillers to take the written examination for the apprentice well driller license with the State Board of Well Drillers.  Topics covered include design standards, well construction, well maintenance and rehabilitation, and well abandonment.  Instruction will also include a complete overview of the regulations pertaining to water well construction regulations in the State of Maryland, with emphasis being placed on the public and environmental health impacts of these regulations.

Are You Ready for a Promotion?  
TRE 5802-15-11:  All Operators; All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
Is it time for you to take the next step in your career path?  Are you ready for a promotion or a new job?  This interactive course is designed for all levels in the water or wastewater industry from trainees, apprentices, operators and superintendents.  Participants will be introduced to the practical skills needed to prepare them for their next job interview, whether they are the interviewer or the interviewee.  Specific topics include resumes, online applications, social media, networking, interviewing do's and don'ts, Equal Employment Opportunity interview questions, test taking tips, negotiating the job offer and transitioning to the new job.  Each participant should bring their resume and job advertisement or job descriptions.

Assessing Your Safety and Health Needs In a Small Treatment Plant 
TRE 4866-11-01:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
Water and wastewater facilities face a huge challenge in maintaining a safe and healthy work environment for plant employees.  How do you know where to start?  What safety standards apply at your plant?  How do you keep your employees safe at work?  This course provides a comprehensive look into the standards applicable in the water treatment field, such as confined spaces, hazard communication, lockout/tagout, and personal protective equipment.  A class exercise in performing a workplace hazard assessment will also be included. Class size is limited to 15 participants.

ATSSA Flagger Certification Training
TRE 5736-15-06:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process)
4 hours
Do you control traffic through a work zone in Maryland? Is it your responsibility to provide safe passage through and around work zones? This certified flagger course is a must for the work zone flagger and will certify you in safe flagging techniques. Topics will include the standard skill set of a good flagger, standard flagger control references, flagging signals and procedures, and standard flagger practices for various situations. ATSSA is a nationally recognized training program taught by a certified ATSSA trainer. Participants successfully completing the training will receive a laminated flagger certification card.

Backflow Prevention Techniques
TRE 4069-07-07:  All Operators (Non-Process)
hours
Participants will discover the sources of cross-connections between potable and non-potable water and the proper use of backflow protection devices.  Using case studies, backflow demonstrations and group discussion, the operator and superintendent will learn how cross-connections can happen, their consequences, and how they can be removed.  Special attention will be given to cross-connection sources that may occur during water and wastewater treatment and how the plant operator and superintendent can identify, prevent and eliminate them.

Basic and Enhanced Nutrient Removal
TRE 4073-07-07:  WW All; IW All (Process) 
7 hours
Wastewater treatment facility personnel will review the biological nutrient removal processes, including both basic and enhanced, for nitrogen and phosphorus removal.  Forms of nitrogen and phosphorus nitrification and denitrification, chemical and biological phosphorus removal, alkalinity adjustment, supplemental carbon sources, process testing, control and permit compliance will all be discussed in detail.  Process configurations and operational techniques to optimize year-round effluent performances will be discussed for both nitrogen and phosphorus.  Class size is limited to 15 participants.

Basic Concepts of Wastewater Treatment 
TRE 4874-11-02:  WW 1-6; S&A; IW All (Process)
7 hours
Operators are responsible for protecting the environment and public health through the appropriate treatment of wastewater received at their facility.  Topics to be covered include all aspects of treating wastewater:  primary treatment, biological treatment methods, secondary treatment, sludge handling, chlorination and dechlorination methods, chemical addition, and use of key data to take control of the treatment process.  This course will assist in preparing operators for the wastewater treatment certification examination and experienced operators will benefit from reviewing key concepts for processes that may not be used at their facilities.  Class size is limited to 15 participants.

Basic Electricity I  
TRE 4792-10-05:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
Electricity has long been recognized as a serious workplace hazard.  This course will detail the OSHA Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices, review the National Electrical Code, define electrical terminology, and cover safe work practices for those employees whose work may expose them to the hazard of being near or exposed to electrical parts.

Basic Electricity II
TRE 4442-09-04:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
The water and wastewater system operator needs to be able to work safely with electrical equipment in his/her daily work environment.  Electricity has long been recognized as a serious workplace hazard.  This course will cover fundamentals of electricity, review generator and transformer theory, and define motor basics.  Controlling and preventing electrical hazards will also be covered.

Basic Math Concepts  
TRE 1709-98-04:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
New and experienced operators will benefit from a mathematical review of concepts related to water and wastewater.  This course is designed to provide operators with problem solving skills.  Practical problem solving topics will include conversion formulas, direct proportions, area calculations and volume calculations.  Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to select correct conversion values for conversion formulas; solve for one unknown; set up equations for work related word problems; and, calculate operational problems.  Each participant must bring a calculator to this course.

Basic Microscopy for Wastewater Operators
TRE 2276-01-04:  All Operators (Process)
7 hours
Wastewater operators will obtain improved process control through microscopic examination of mixed liquors and other waste streams.  Starting with the basics, participants will be introduced to microscope features and benefits, the microscope selection process, and cost factors.  The course includes an overview of sampling, slide preparation, maintenance, staining techniques, and sample examination.  The course will also cover organism identification and the effects of the presence, absence, mobility, and organism type on wastewater process control. 

Biochemical Oxygen Demand and Solids
TRE 4707-09-12:  WW All; IWW All (Non-Process)
7 hours
Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) and Suspended Solids are two of the most important parameters used in the wastewater treatment process.  In this course, participants will be introduced to the principles and applications of BOD and Suspended Solids.  Topics covered include the accepted methodology needed to perform these tests.  Participants will set up the procedure and obtain and interpret results.  Participants will be able to successfully perform a complete suspended solids and BOD analysis of a wastewater sample; list the procedures necessary to ensure the accuracy and precision of the test results; and demonstrate selection, calibrations, and maintenance of the laboratory equipment required for each test.  Please register early; this class is limited to 12 participants.

Biological Components of Wastewater    
TRE 5702-15-04:  WW All, IWW All, WWC; All Superintendents (Process) 
7 Hours
Wastewater contains countless numbers of living organisms, most of which are too small to see with the naked eye.  This course will review the wide variety of pathogens that are present in wastewater, sludge, foam, compost, aerosols and contaminated surfaces and present potential and actual risks to wastewater personnel.  Pathogens reviewed include:  viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa and helminthes (worms) as well as allergens, endotoxins and exotoxins.  Topics presented include: an overview of relevant history, hazards and organisms; aerosols, compost, foam and sludge; disease transmission and the body's defenses; removal, inactivation and destruction of pathogens; hygiene measures; and protective equipment and immunizations.

Biological Nutrient Removal Process Control
TRE 3622-05-12:  WW A (Process)
7 hours
Operating staff will be provided assistance in developing a comprehensive process control program with the ultimate goal of optimizing the performance of a BNR WWTP.  Participants will be provided with tools to evaluate process control test results and make appropriate process control adjustments.  There will be some review of basic activated sludge principles before discussing the nitrification-denitrification processes.  In addition, chemical and biological phosphorus removal basics and process control will be addressed.

BNR to Enhanced Nutrient Removal 
TRE 4074-07-07:  WW All; IWW All (Process)
7 hours
Upgrading sewage treatment plants for nutrient removal is one of Maryland's top environmental priorities.  This course addresses the implications of upgrading from Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) to Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR).  Topics covered will include: a review of the basics of nitrification, denitrification, and phosphorus removal; various process configurations will be discussed to accomplish the required levels of nutrient removal; and process control testing and adjustments will also be examined to optimize ENR plant performance.

Certification Examination Preparation - Mathematics
TRE 4139-07-12:  All Operators  (Non-Process) 
hours
Beginning with concepts as basic as the difference between numbers and numerals, this course reviews mathematics principles and operations through trigonometry.  The focus throughout is on job-oriented learners in the water and wastewater industry.  The emphasis is on understanding mathematical principles rather than on rote memorization of techniques.  The lesson on calculators explains the three kinds of calculator logic systems, how to identify which kind of logic any calculator uses, and how to enter problems to ensure that the answer is correct.

Certification Examination Preparation (Wastewater)
TRE 2833-03-06:  WW All; WC All (Non-Process) 
7 hours
Preparing for and passing the certification examination is often the most challenging part of becoming a certified operator.  This one-day course is designed to help prepare wastewater operators for the certification examination.  Mathematics, process issues, and maintenance problems will be reviewed specifically in the context of wastewater treatment.  General math and maintenance principles will be reviewed to meet the specific job needs of those individuals attending.  Each participant should bring a calculator to this class.

Certification Examination Preparation (Water)
TRE 2832-03-06:  WT All; WD All (Non-Process) 
7 hours
Preparing for and passing the certification examination is often the most challenging part of becoming a certified operator.  This one-day course is designed to help prepare water operators for their certification examination.  Mathematics, process issues, and maintenance problems will be reviewed specifically in the context of water treatment and distribution.  General math and maintenance principles will be reviewed to meet the specific job needs of those individuals attending.  Each participant should bring a calculator to this class.

Chemical Feed Applications and Mathematics
TRE 3707-06-04:  All Operators  (Non-Process)
7 hours
Effective chemical application is essential to the treatment of water and wastewater.  This course will start with an open discussion of chemical feed applications in both the water and wastewater treatment fields.  A workshop focusing on calculating chemical feed dosages will follow.  The workshop includes calculating the capacity of tanks, flow rates, and chemical dosages for disinfection, de-chlorination, odor control, coagulation, and corrosion control.  Students will progress at their own pace through multiple and progressively more difficult quizzes.  This course does not cover activated sludge processes.  Please register early; this class is limited to 15 participants.  Each participant should bring a calculator to this class. 

Chemical Treatment
TRE 6021-16-11 All WW; All IWW; All WT (Process)
7 hours
Most water and wastewater treatment plants now use chemicals for some of the processes. In water treatment, chemicals are used to adjust pH, aid in settling particulate matter, to enhance filtration, and to remove trace constituents. In wastewater treatment, chemicals can be used to remove phosphorus; they can enhance settling in primary and/or biological treatment; they can assist in odor control, sludge thickening, sludge dewatering, and sludge stabilization. In this class, students will learn about the various chemicals used, how they can be stored and handled safely, and how to calculate dosages. Ideas on costs and how to contract for the purchase of chemicals will be provided.

Chloramines - Potable Water Disinfection with a Different Twist 
TRE 5131-12-06:  All Operators  (Process)
7 hours
Water operators will explore the use of, processes related to, and the issues regarding chloramination in their potable water supply.  The course begins by comparing and contrasting common free chlorine versus chloramination in primary disinfection of potable water supplies, and related operations.  Next, participants will receive an explanation of what it takes to make chloramination work for a typical public water supply, as well as establishing an appropriate chlorine-to-ammonia ratio.  Other topics covered include: the advantages of this primary disinfection, residual based measurements, types of problems a water system should address when using chlorine/ammonia compounds, and which types of customers may have additional concerns about this type of disinfection.

Chlorination Disinfection Science for Water and Wastewater Operations
TRE 4684-09-11:  All Operators  (Process)
7 hours
Operators will review the dosing technology for the three basic forms of chlorine disinfection and the chemistry difference, followed by a look at the pros and cons of each type of system.  Topics covered will include an analysis of a gas based chlorination process to determine whether it is advantageous or cost effective to change to another process, when one looks at the "real" costs; an examination of Hypochlorite strength and residual testing methods and why Hypochlorite users don't routinely measure product strength; a discussion on why on-site generation systems may be appropriate and cost effective; and a look at simple ways to minimize disinfection by-products.

Chlorination Technology
TRE 5905-16-05: All Operators (Process)
7 hours 
Chlorine is a widely used disinfectant which can be supplied in different many forms including chlorine gas, hypochlorite solutions, and other chlorine compounds in solid or liquid from. As the utility industry seeks safer and more effective disinfectants, many treatment plants are now applying sodium hypochlorite. Operators will benefit from this one-day course designed to review the benefits and drawbacks of switching from gas chlorination to sodium hypochlorite. Topics will include principles of feeding gas chlorine and hypochlorite metering pumps as applied in the water/ waste water industry. Preventative maintenance recommendations for both chlorine gas and liquid bleach feed systems will be included. The disinfection action of chlorine in water treatment is described in detail as well as the hazards associated with the safe handling and storage.

Coagulation, Flocculation, Sedimentation and Filtration 
TRE 275-87-05:  WW 3-5, A; WT 3-4; IWW 5-7 (Process) 
7 hours
Designed to assist water plant operators, this advanced course focuses on tracking the flow of water through the four fundamental chemical/physical processes in water treatment.  Participants will examine chemical reactions, the physical event of each process, and the plant equipment involved.  Instruction and practice in solving typical operational and mathematical problems associated with these treatment functions will also be covered.  (This course has received TRE certification for both water and wastewater operators because some wastewater treatment plants may employ one or more of these processes).  Each participant should bring a calculator to this class.

Collection System Operation and Maintenance 
TRE 5128-12-06:  Operators All WW, IWW, WWC (Non-Process)
7 hours
The new and experienced collection system worker will be provided with a comprehensive overview of collection system theory, construction, and operation and maintenance as it relates to wastewater systems.  Topics covered will include the purpose, design and construction of wastewater collection systems; the environmental impact of a poorly functioning collection system; how waste water collection systems work; the worker's role in operation and maintenance and the methods used in maintaining and repairing collection system components.

Collection System Troubleshooting 
TRE 4987-11-08:  WW 1-5; WC All; IWW All (Non-Process)
7 hours
When a Collection System needs troubleshooting because of problems, operators are required to move quickly.  In this course, the collection system operator will be familiarized with the techniques and methodology used to evaluate the wastewater collection system performance.  Subjects covered will include flow monitoring;   physical surveys (manhole inspection); smoke testing; dyed water (flooding); internal inspection; and, the removal of infiltration and inflow sources. 

Concepts of Drinking Water Treatment
TRE 3819-06-07:  WT All; WD (Process)
7 hours
Totally new to the drinking water treatment field, or just looking for a refresher?  Recently hired apprentices and trainees will be introduced to the Safe Drinking Water Act and how it applies to the operator.  The concepts of water sources, water storage and distribution systems will be introduced during this course.  Other topics covered will include basic concepts of pumping and pressure maintenance, disinfection, storage tanks, fluoridation, corrosion control, and plant safety.  Participants will further discuss the key elements of an effective safety program.  Class size is limited to 15 participants.

Concepts of Wastewater Treatment
TRE 4705-09-12:  WW All; IWW All (Process)
14 hours
Operators looking for a refresher, recently hired apprentices and trainees who are new to the wastewater treatment field, will be introduced to the chemical and biological characteristics of wastewater, preliminary and primary treatment, secondary treatment, advanced treatment for nutrient removal, disinfection and sludge management.  Participants will review the NPDES system, calculate chlorine usage and discuss the hazards encountered in the wastewater treatment system. This course will also cover wastewater treatment technology operations and regulations in an effort to prepare the student for the wastewater operators' exam.

Concepts of Wastewater Treatment Certification Exam Prep  
TRE 5803-15-11:  WW All; IW All; WC (Process)
7 hours
Operators, recently hired apprentices and trainees who are new to the wastewater treatment field will be introduced to the chemical and biological characteristics of wastewater, preliminary and primary treatment, secondary treatment, advanced treatment for nutrient removal, disinfection and sludge management.  Participants will review the NPDES system, calculate chlorine usage and discuss the hazards encountered in the wastewater treatment system.  This course will also cover wastewater treatment technology operations and regulations in an effort to prepare the student for the wastewater operators' exam.

Confined Space Entry and the Operator
TRE 1832-98-11:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours 
Employees who work in confined spaces may face increased risk of exposure to serious hazards.  Participants in this course will be introduced to the requirements for permit-required confined spaces for both the OSHA standard and the Maryland-specific requirement as outlined in OSHA 29 CFR Part 1910.  Topics covered will include: entry permit programs, criteria for permit-required confined spaces, health and safety procedures for workers in confined spaces, hazard identification and equipment requirements, and rescue procedures.  Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to determine if an area is a confined space; evaluate hazards associated with confined space entry, including lockout/tagout procedures; develop policies and procedures to address confined space hazards in the workplace; and select suitable confined space entry equipment.

Confined Space Entry - 2 Day
TRE 4743-10-02 All Operators (Non-Process)
Participants in this course will be introduced to the requirements for permit-required confined spaces for both the OSHA standard and the Maryland-specific requirement as outlined in OSHA 29 CFR Part 1910.  Topics covered will include entry permit programs, criteria for permit-required confined spaces, health and safety procedures for workers in confined spaces, hazard identification and equipment requirements, and rescue procedures.  Day 1 will be lecture based and day 2 will provide the participants with hands-on experience using their own equipment. (This course is taught preferably onsite using the facility's confined space program.)

Conflict Resolution: The Operator and Superintendent    
TRE1826-98-11:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process) 
7 hours
The question isn't whether you will have conflict; rather, it is how effectively you manage conflict.  Dealing with conflict is a normal requirement of daily life, at the work site, in the field, both as an employee or supervisor.  This interactive training will provide both experienced and newer employees in the water and wastewater industry with the knowledge and skills to effectively manage and resolve conflict in their daily work life and beyond.  Both operators and superintendents will learn the basics of effective negotiations, including how to distinguish critical interests and discover what's needed for successful negotiation or collaboration.  Learn skills that maximize your ability to reach a solution, including whom to involve in negotiations, what issues may be negotiated successfully, and when to seek assistance.  The course will also provide an understanding of key approaches and techniques used by all successful negotiators.  Participants will practice key negotiating skills such as negotiation preparation, active listening, effective questioning, and reframing through a series of interactive simulations.

Conversion or Removal of Nitrogen from Sewage 
TRE 4704-09-12:  WW All; IW All (Process)
7 hours
Why and how is nitrogen removed (or converted to a less objectionable form) from wastewater?  Treatment operators will gain an increased understanding and operational skills regarding treatment processes; taking into account structural requirements, chemical requirements, operational strategies, and performance standards: nitrification; denitrification; breakpoint chlorination; ion exchanges; ammonia stripping; nitrogen sources and forms; biological exchange; and combined phosphorus and nitrogen removal systems technology.

Cross Connection Control Program Development and Implementation for Utility Personnel
TRE 5360-13-03: All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours 
Cross-Connection Control remains a critical link in protecting public health by maintaining the quality of the drinking water.  Water quality will be jeopardized without a persistent effort in cross-connection control.  The State of Maryland COMAR 26.04.01.32 requires all public water suppliers of water to prepare and submit for approval to the State of Maryland Department of Environment, Water Supply Program (MDE) a plan for controlling and monitoring cross-connections.  The public water supplier upon receiving approval for the cross-connection control plan from MDE shall implement the cross-connection control plan immediately.  This course is designed to meet the needs of the cross-connection professional by focusing on the essentials of developing and managing an effective cross-connection control program.  Topics include:  legal authority, policies, budget preparation, recordkeeping, training and education, assembly standards, the elements of a good ordinance, and liabilities and responsibilities.  In addition, this course will also focus on recordkeeping, control of backflow prevention assemblies and devices, public education and training of personnel.

Cross-Connection Control & Legionella Program Management
TRE 6219-17-08: All Operators; All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours 
Water quality will be jeopardized without a persistent effort in cross connection control and legionella management.  There are many cases that have been documented where cross-connections have been responsible for the pollution or contamination of the public water supply and the distribution system that have resulted in the spread of disease. The State of Maryland COMAR 26.04.01.32 requires all public water suppliers of water to prepare and submit for approval to the State of Maryland Department of Environment Water Supply Program (MDE) a plan for controlling & monitoring cross connections. This course will also cover best practices for legionella control/management, with a focus/emphasis on evaluating plumbing systems within a private water user and how PWS may assist. The discussions will cover legionella history and characteristics, potential sources & disease aspects, EPA regulations/water treatment/control, responsibilities/liability, managing legionella (chlorination method, dead leg elimination, system flushing, cross connection program, water quality, work on water mains, etc.) and working with private water systems (how to respond to potential outbreaks, etc.).

Disinfection Operations for Water and Wastewater Systems
TRE 1842-98-12:  All Operators (Process)
14 hours
Water and wastewater system operators will learn about chlorine and its alternatives for the primary disinfection of drinking water and treated wastewater.  These alternatives may reduce disinfection by-products and eliminate the need for dechlorination.  The course will describe the key criteria for disinfectant selection, including cost, safety, maintainability, control, and monitoring considerations.  Also presented are the pros and cons of chlorine dioxide and chloramines as alternatives to help reduce disinfection by-products and the benefits and features of alternative disinfectants like ozone, ultraviolet, mixed oxidant systems, and peroxide.  The course includes a look at the various laboratory methods to determine residuals and demonstrations of some of the practical simplified test protocols.  Finally, some class time is devoted to hands-on practice of a number of residual test methods. 

DIY Energy Audit    
TRE 5662-15-03:  All Operators; All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
Concerned about energy efficiency and conservation at your treatment plant?  This course will present information specific to drinking water and wastewater operators on developing an Energy Management Program and how to conduct a Level 1 energy audit in their facility.  Topics covered will include how to create an Energy Management Plan, conducting a Level 1 energy audit, calculating your costs and how to finance your energy saving projects.

Effective Particle/Turbidity Removal at Water and Wastewater Treatment Facilities     
TRE 6163-17-06:  All WT, All WW, WD, IWW (Process) 
7 hours
Designed to assist water and wastewater facility operations staff, this advanced course focuses on the operational considerations associated with effective turbidity and particle removal in conventional water treatment plants and advanced wastewater treatment plants.  Physical and chemical methods of treatment will be covered in detail, including coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation/clarification, and filtration.  Descriptions of the technology associated with each, as well as routine monitoring, operation, and troubleshooting will be discussed.  Exercises in solving typical operational problems associated with these treatment technologies and related process math will be included.

Electrical Blueprint Reading for Operators     
TRE 1245-95-07:  All Operators (Non-Process) 
7 hours
Do you know how to read an electrical drawing?  This course is designed for water and wastewater operators who will need to interpret basic electrical blueprints when troubleshooting an electrical problem.  Topics covered will include a review of basic electrical symbols; the meanings of the symbols and information; abbreviations; series and parallel components; component relationships; diagrams and illustrations; and the basic principles associated with motor control circuits.

Electrical Safety and Lockout/Tagout
TRE 2672-02-11:  All Operators (Non-Process) 
7 hours
According to OSHA, failure to control energy accounts for nearly 10 percent of the serious accidents in many industries.  Water and wastewater operators are exposed daily to electrical components and are often required to have lockout/tagout programs in place.  Participants in this course will be introduced to the components of 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S, Electrical Safe Work Practices and the lockout/tagout procedures outlined in 29 CFR 1910.147, Control of Hazardous Energy.  Further focus will be on the safety hazards associated with working around electrical equipment and tools, with an overview of the main components of a lockout/tagout program. 

Electrical Safety and the NFPA 70E
TRE 4304-08-06:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
The NFPA 70E standard addresses electrical safety requirements for employee workplaces that are necessary for the practical safeguarding of employees.  This training is to prepare operators and technicians to comprehend ARC ratings, create safe working conditions, recognize electrical shock hazards and be knowledgeable about transformers and circuit breakers.  In addition, the course will cover how to execute a lockout/tagout and the importance of the using proper personal protective equipment.   

Emerging Infectious Diseases and the Public Utility  
TRE 5614-14-12:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
In the past thirty years there have been thirty-five new infectious diseases identified around the world, with names now familiar to us, such as Hepatitis C, Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever, and the variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.  The prevention and control of infectious diseases involves dealing with numerous pathogens, each of which poses a specific threat to public health.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides guidance on handling wastewater safely, and this course will focus on the latest information available.  Topics covered will include the various factors attributing to the transmission of infectious diseasesand measures which can be taken to help reduce the spread of these diseases by the public utility.  We will also address basic hygiene practices, personal protective equipment, and disposal actions that should be taken by water and wastewater operators when handling untreated wastewater.

Energy Management - A Small System Approach
TRE 5819-15-12:  All Operators; All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
Handling the wastewater processes and providing drinking water for the citizens of Maryland requires a substantial use of energy on a daily basis.  Energy costs are steadily rising and energy management has become one of the most significant issues facing wastewater and water utilities today, with your water and wastewater utility consumption responsible for 30-60% of your energy bill.  This course will provide superintendents, town managers and municipal officials with a step-by-step methodology to identify, implement, measure, and improve energy efficiency at their wastewater treatment utilities.  Specifically, we will go process by process, look at what each device does, and determine how we can reduce energy costs by controlling the process and equipment.  Case studies will be presented and energy management resources will be provided. Participants should bring a copy of a winter and summer electric bill from their facility along with the corresponding monthly operation report.

Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) – Fixed Film Processes 
TRE 5343-13-02:  WW All; IW All (Process)
7 hours
Wastewater treatment facility personnel will review the basic and enhanced nutrient removal (BNR/ENR) processes for removal of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) from wastewater.  Nutrient removal regulations pertinent to protecting the Chesapeake Bay will be discussed.  BNR/ENR systems with fixed film/attached growth technologies will be the focus of class discussion.  Topics include:  forms and sources of nitrogen and phosphorus, biological nitrification and denitrification for nitrogen removal, need for BOD removal to enhance nitrogen removal, biological uptake and chemical addition for phosphorus removal, alkalinity adjustment, supplemental carbon requirements, process testing, process control, process math, and permit compliance.  The importance of methanol addition or other carbon sources like glycerin will be fully discussed as a food source for denitrifying organisms.  Metal salt addition and effluent filtration using granular media and low-pressure membrane filters for enhanced suspended solids and phosphorus removal will be presented.  Key design issues, process configurations, and operational techniques for biological aerated filters (BAF), up and down flow denitrification filters, integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS), and moving bed bio-film reactors (MBBR) will be discussed.  Optimizing operations for year-round effluent performances will be discussed for both nitrogen and phosphorus removal.  Operational issues related to TN and TP removal will be identified along with recommended corrections.

Enhanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) – Process Control
TRE 4087-07-09:  WW All; IW All (Process)
16 hours
Upgrading wastewater treatment plants for nutrient removal is one of Maryland’s top environmental priorities.  This two-day course addresses the implications of upgrading from biological nutrient removal (BNR) to enhanced nutrient removal (ENR).  Training sessions will review the basics of nitrification, denitrification, and phosphorus removal first.  Various process configurations will be discussed to accomplish the required levels of nutrient removal.  Process control testing and adjustments will also be examined to optimize ENR plant performance.  In addition, there will be two field exercises at BNR/ENR facilities.  The facilities have utilized different process configurations to accomplish the same level of treatment.  Following the field exercises, classroom discussions will focus on the operations and maintenance similarities and differences between the two facilities.

Evaluating Water System Processes to Eliminate Sanitary Risks
TRE 4322-08-07:  WT All; WD; Superintendents WT, WD (Process) 
7 hours
Water system supervisory and operating staff must have a thorough knowledge of all processes that comprise their water system.  This would include the treatment, storage, and distribution system processes.  Building on that knowledge, this course will focus on the elimination of sanitary risks in each process to ensure the delivery of safe drinking water to the consumer.  Conducting this evaluation will not only eliminate potential threats to water quality, but will also prepare water staff for sanitary survey inspections conducted by MDE regulatory personnel as required by the SDWA.

Excavation Safety
TRE 1879-99-03:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
OSHA states excavation and trenching are among the most hazardous construction operations.  They define an excavation as any man-made cut, cavity, trench, or depression in the earth's surface formed by earth removal.  Participants will be introduced to the requirements of the OSHA Excavation Standard, 29 CFR 1926 (Subpart P).  Subjects covered will be the causes of trench failure, soil classification, trench protection systems, hazardous atmospheres and conditions, inspection techniques, and competent person responsibilities.  This course will provide the basic training requirements for competent persons.  Additional instruction will be given on:  tests used to classify soil types in the field, the different methods of cave-in protection; selecting proper shoring methods using the provided OSHA tables; and the methodology used to minimize these and other hazards.

Fall Protection
TRE 5009-11-09:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
Individuals working at heights require fall protection equipment.  Participants will be introduced to fall protection principles and codes including fall protection systems and methodology.  Course topics include the requirements for safe work procedures in the construction industry, fall protection requirements, selection of protective equipment, rescue planning, pre-planning, on-site fall protection, and use and limits of a fall arrest system.

First Line Supervisor
TRE 4086-07-09:  All Operators,  All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
The First Line Supervisor Training Program is an interactive, participant-involved one-day course designed to expose supervisors and aspiring supervisors to a variety of critical skills, situational scenarios and strategies for effective supervision.  Participants will be exposed to various supervisory dilemmas where they apply “lessons learned” to specific managerial problems and mock scenarios that routinely confront the first line supervisor on a daily basis.  Accountability and responsibility will be explored as well as the supervisor’s role in institutionalizing ethical behavior.  Instruction will also focus on the supervisor’s use of counseling as a behavioral control technique to solve performance-related problems while providing a foundation for future performance expectations.

From Wire to Water: Documenting and Conserving Energy Use in Water and Wastewater Facilities
TRE 4143-07-12:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
Designed by EPA, this course is aimed at documenting and improving the use of electrical energy at treatment facilities.  The student is shown how to break-down an electric bill into simple forms, then how to use that information to calculate simple payback and cost savings on equipment repairs versus equipment upgrades.  Included are system evaluation checklists, standard operating procedures and standard maintenance procedures.

Fundamental Principles of Wastewater Treatment Processes
TRE 4683-09-11:  WW All, IW All (Process)
7 hours
New wastewater operators, or those who are looking for a basic refresher, will benefit from this class on the fundamental principles of wastewater treatment.  Participants will explore the different wastewater treatment processes common to our industry today.  Topics covered will include basic wastewater treatment techniques common to all processes; various types of wastewater treatment, including lagoon science and sequencing batch reactors (SBRs); a comparison of the most common treatment processes and variants; and a discussion on the pros and cons of one treatment technique over another.

General Laboratory Concepts
TRE 2869-03-08:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
Laboratory results and proper lab techniques are important in developing records of plant operations.  Laboratory data allows operators to know how efficiently the plant is operating and helps them to predict and prevent troubles that may be developing in plant processes.  This course is designed to introduce the operator and technicians to simplified methods that are outlined in detail in Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater.  The course will introduce a glossary of terms, basic laboratory need-to-know information, and laboratory equipment and techniques.  The course will include a discussion of sampling, data recording and recordkeeping, quality control, and safety. 

Generators, Engines and Emergency Power 
TRE 5430-13-08:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
Is your water or wastewater system prepared? Are you able to handle a loss of electricity at your facility during a natural disaster using generators and other forms of emergency power? This course will give the student a working knowledge of generators and emergency power used in treatment Plants. Topics covered will include:  standby & emergency generation theory of operation, prime movers, AC generator control, operation & protection, generator loading, basic troubleshooting and maintenance.  Operators will discuss real world problems with standby and emergency power systems and the methods of troubleshooting and repairing of these problems.

Getting to Know Your Water System 
TRE 5342-13-02:  WT All; WD (Process)
7 hours
Water treatment operators will benefit from this introductory course which will explore the uses of water, water sources, and the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of water.  Discussions will include an introduction to the Safe Drinking Water Act and a review of both Primary and Secondary Drinking Water regulations and the responsibilities of Operators.  Topics will include:  groundwater and surface water contamination, basic water treatment (disinfection, pH adjustment, etc.), chlorination technologies, and a review of basic math for use by the plant and distribution system operator.

Groundwater Treatment Options
TRE 6020-16-11: All WT (Process)
7 hours
Due to its instant availability and quality, groundwater has become a prime source of drinking water around the country. This course is intended for public water system operators who use groundwater as their source of supply. Topics will include typical groundwater hydrology and surface and subsurface features of a typical production well. Ground water treatment options for water quality challenges will be introduced with emphasis on disinfection using chlorine, hypochlorite, UV, ozone, and chlorine dioxide. Regulatory challenges related to the disinfection byproducts rule are also addressed.

Hazard Communication (Right-to-Know) - Globally Harmonized System
TRE 5431-13-08:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
Over 30 million American workers are exposed to hazardous chemicals in their workplaces.  Chemicals pose a wide range of health hazards (such as irritation, sensitization, and carcinogenicity) and physical hazards (such as flammability, corrosion, and reactivity).  OSHA's Hazard Communication standard (HCS) is designed to ensure that information about these hazards and associated protective measures is disseminated.  The HCS is now aligned with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS).  This course will discuss hazard communication (Right-to-Know) with the updates to the Hazard Communication Standard (HCS); and will provide a common and coherent approach to classifying chemicals and communicating hazard information on labels and safety data sheets.

High Performance Utilities
TRE 2004-99-08:  All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
Organizations in a constantly changing work environment are now focusing on satisfying customer needs outside the organization, as well as satisfying changing employee needs inside the organization.  This course is designed to introduce the “new” management practices that can shift performance from functional to optimal.  Topics covered will include internal and external forces of changes, historical vs. strategic thinking, and organizational values.

How to Prevent a Catastrophic Event to Your Water or Wastewater System    
TRE 5703-15-04:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Process)
7 hours
Operators and superintendents must recognize that many of the common standard practices used at water and wastewater systems today can lead to a potential catastrophic issue at their facilities.  This course looks at some of these issues, where if not addressed, can ultimately lead to events that potentially cause bodily harm or even kill operators and customers if not effectively addressed.   First, we will look at the results of lack of verification of even the very basic chemicals delivered to our facilities, document case histories where events have occurred, and show system personnel how simple and easy a verification program is to establish.  Next, we will address operational issues such as the laboratory result where the Pink-Red color that develops in the DPD Chlorine test, but is not chlorine; and what operations personnel can to do to mitigate these issues.  Additionally, learn why the Infrastructure Age requires extra vigilance to prevent system contamination.  Even with backflow prevention, the fact remains that a garden hose is still the number one potential contamination source for water systems.  We will discuss why water stagnation and biofilm formation can lead to bacterial contamination and how operations can minimize these issues with simple low-cost steps.

Hydrology Source and Water Conservation
TRE 2461-02-04:  WT All; WD (Process)
7 hours 
Water supply hydrology and conservation are two of the important topics to be covered in this one-day class.  The water treatment operator will be introduced to many issues surrounding water sources and conservation, specifically groundwater and surface water sources.  Other topics covered will include options available for the facility during emergency situations, alternative water sources, use and conservation of water, and practical application of the information as it applies to the field.

Hypochlorite Disinfection 
TRE 5456-13-11:  All Operators (Process)
7 hours 
Hypochlorites - sodium and calcium - are the most common form of disinfection used in water treatment. This course focuses on the properties, use, and feed equipment when using hypochlorite for disinfection.   Operators will be introduced to the uses and properties of hypochlorites, chemical handling including safety, regulatory requirements, and feed equipment.  Various mathematics principles will be addressed throughout the workshop including changing % concentrations, dosage/feed rates, chlorine demand/dose, and CT calculations.

Industrial Wastewater Treatment Basics
TRE 2957-04-03:  IW 1-7 (Process)
7 hours
Industrial wastewater treatment covers the mechanisms and processes used to treat waters that have been influenced by industrial or commercial processes prior to its release to a municipal treatment plant or directly to the environment.  This course will present an overview of typical industrial wastewater treatment processes.  It is geared towards establishing a better understanding of common treatment systems for operations personnel and preparation for industrial wastewater certification exams.  Processes such as flow equalization, pH adjustment, polymer addition, metals removal through chemical coagulation and clarification, filtration, oil/water separation, and basic biological treatment will be discussed. 

Instrumentation and Controls
TRE 1819-98-10:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours 
Operators of water and wastewater plants use instrumentation to control and monitor many plant processes.  The course examines from an operator's perspective systems that automatically open and close valves, control pump speeds, and pace chemical feed dosages.  The class introduces the fundamentals of measuring, displaying, and controlling important operating parameters such as levels, pressures, and flows.

Instrumentation and Controls - Basics
TRE 6161-17-06: All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours 
Instrumentation and controls has become an integral part in the day-to-day operations of any treatment plant to control and/or monitor plant processes. This course provides entry-level operators with a basic knowledge of instrumentation and how to use it to monitor water and wastewater treatment processes. Operators will learn the skills to recognize abnormal operation, perform rudimentary preventative maintenance, and report malfunctions. Topics will include typical instruments and their purposes, use of Original Equipment Manufacturer’s manuals, Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA), basics of monitoring and control of processes using the Human Machine Interface (HMI), types of alarms, basic diagnostic operations, and preventative maintenance measures.

Introduction to Process Mathematics
TRE 6025-16-11: All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
Operators entering into the industry will benefit from a mathematical overview related to water and wastewater. This course is a stepping stone to more complex mathematical formulas presented in the Applied Process Mathematics course. Practical problem solving topics will include conversion formulas, direct proportions, area calculations and volume calculations. Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to select correct conversion values for conversion formulas; solve for one unknown; and set up equations for work-related work problems.

Introduction to SCADA
TRE 4422-09-03:   All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
Wastewater and Water Operators will gain a basic understanding of what SCADA is and how it interfaces with treatment plant operations.  The course covers review of typical vocabulary and symbols used in SCADA systems; SCADA basic operation and functions; how SCADA improves operational control; and common problems operators face using SCADA to operate their facilities. SCADA maintenance, troubleshooting, PLC, VFD operation and new technologies in SCADA system are also covered.

Introduction to Small System Water Treatment
TRE 4396-09-03:  WT All (Process)
6 hours
Participants with learn general information about the characteristics of water and how chemicals are used to treat source water.  Subjects covered will include the characteristics of water, the treatment requirements for ground and surface water as well as the chemical and feed systems used in basic water treatment.

Introduction to Variable Frequency Drives 
TRE 4314-08-06:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
Variable-frequency drives (VFDs) allow operators to fine-tune processes while reducing costs for energy and equipment maintenance.  Topics for this course include:  What are VFDs, why use them, and how do they work.  Also reviewed will be troubleshooting and maintenance requirements related to VFDs.  Learn about available features in hardware, control, and firmware available in drives.

Jar Testing
TRE 1827-98-11:  WT All; WW All; IW All (Non-Process)
7 hours
Operators need to be comfortable with basic jar testing laboratory techniques.  This course is designed to introduce these basic techniques. Participants will interpret and record results, select the most appropriate coagulant for testing water type, and identify process control options and alternatives based on coagulation results of the jar test. Class size is limited to 12 participants. 

Laboratory Outsourcing (What to do when results are not what you expect!) 
TRE 5341-13-02:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
Does your treatment facility outsource its laboratory testing?  The operating conditions for water or wastewater treatment samples being analyzed, due to outsourcing, have many challenging concerns especially when the tests and resulting data are interpreted and the results are not what were expected.  This course is designed to explain how to use a Laboratory Compliance and Audit Awareness procedure (the key in the common laboratory processes/procedures) and a control tool checklist to investigate and determine how laboratory analysis is being performed by outsourced laboratories.  Topics discussed will include those areas which describe the outsourced laboratory compliance which must be assessed, such as:  general housekeeping, labeling of source samples, certifications, standards, chemical storage and containment, health and safety concerns, chain of custody, manifests, quality assurance, and general laboratory practices.  In addition, this course will discuss the transport of samples, emergency preparedness (earthquake safety), contingency planning and emergency procedures in the event of fire and electrical outage, hazardous waste, emergency preparedness (means of egress if natural disaster) documented reporting for certification and State records and recordkeeping.

Ladder Diagram and Troubleshooting
TRE 6017-16-11: All Operators (NP)
7 hours
The water and wastewater system operator needs to be able to identify and utilize the electrical equipment used in their daily work environment. We will start with an overview of electrical, instrumentation and mechanical symbols and components as well as their basic functions. Electrical quantities will be discussed in terms of definition, units and measurements and application in ladder diagrams. An overview of industrial control components and their schematic symbols commonly used in water/waste water facilities to control pumps and motors will be explained. Also covered is logic gates principles used in relay logic and PLC ladder logic including OR gates, AND gates and XOR gates. Finally, we will finish with basic construction and troubleshooting of start/stop circuits for pumps/motors.

Legal Liability: The Operator and Superintendent 
TRE 5318-13-01:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
As a water or wastewater treatment superintendent, manager or operator, it is critical you recognize the various types of legal liability you face while operating your systems and the repercussions of your actions.  This course will provide participants with an overview of the legal requirements of the Clean Water Act, Safe Drinking Water Act, and Maryland's water pollution and water supply laws, as well as additional requirements created by the courts and professional certification authorities.  Attendees will leave with an understanding of the consequences of failing to meet statutory requirements and professional standards in their daily activities.  This interactive course will explore issues through real-life examples of legal actions against facility staff and simulations of facility operations. 

Lessons Learned: Process Optimization Based on ENR Case Studies
TRE 6019-16-11: WW 3, 5, A; IWW 5, 6 (Process)
7 hours
The key components of the MCET Technical Assistance (TA) program includes the development of a comprehensive process control test program, understanding appropriate process adjustments based on process control data, and compliance with ENR performance requirements established by MDE. While working with ENR wastewater treatment plants and accomplishing these components, important lessons were learned by O&M staff at these facilities as well as the TA providers from MCET. The lessons learned related to performance limiting factors (PLFs) that had to be addressed in order to achieve the process optimization goals established by the TA team. This course will review case studies of 4 or 5 ENR wastewater treatment plants in Maryland who participated in the MCET Technical Assistance (TA) program for a minimum of one year and will discuss in detail the lessons learned and how strategies were developed to meet the ENR requirements of the State.

Lift Stations
TRE 1243-95-07:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
Day-to-day operation and maintenance procedures for lift stations will be reviewed in this course.  The design aspects of lift station operations and the associated math will be covered.  These aspects include volume calculations, fill/draw times, wet well/dry well relationships and associated pump types, e.g., submersibles, dry pit submersibles, and conventional centrifugals.  Safety issues related to confined spaces, lockout/tagout, slipping/tripping, ventilation/ atmospheric testing, and ladders will be covered along with preventive maintenance as it relates to lift station components and basic troubleshooting.  Lift station log books, housekeeping, spill handling, and security considerations will be addressed. 

Lockout/Tagout
TRE 1748-98-06:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
Appropriate techniques for controlling and isolating all power sources which a plant employee might come into contact will be covered in this course.  These include electrical currents, hydraulic flows, compressed air, and even vacuums.  In addition, participants will learn to develop and describe in writing a lockout/tagout procedure for their facility.

Managing Diversity and Resolving Conflict in the Workplace
TRE 4142-07-12:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
Explore the concepts associated with diversity and learn how to resolve conflict from a variety of perspectives.  Using a diversity quiz and other approaches, the water and wastewater personnel will discover that diversity transcends race and sex and that there are significant advantages to inclusiveness.  Operators will also focus on workplace conflict and their role in helping to mitigate and work through situations.  Using a conflict management instrument, the participants will be able to identify their own conflict management style.

Managing Multiple Priorities in the Water and Wastewater Industry    
TRE 5664-15-03:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
Does your position description state "manage multiple priorities?"  In today's work environment, superintendents, managers and operators are responsible for more and more tasks with fewer people available to perform them.  Managing multiple priorities is necessary to efficiently handle workflow.  It requires using proven methods to increase effectiveness when multi-tasking.  Specific topics include: methods for establishing goals and priorities, skills for more effective planning of work, and techniques for utilizing available resources to efficiently accomplish goals within the water and wastewater industry.  Additionally, your role as a superintendent/manager in assisting your subordinates to work effectively will be examined.

Managing Off-Site Employees
TRE 4299-08-06:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
Managing and communicating with off-site water and wastewater employees can sometimes be problematic.  Both the supervisor and the employee struggle to work within the confines of their positions, with the added complication of being at different work sites.  Keys to effective off-site management include encouraging accountability and reliability using established work performance goals, standards, and controls.  Other solutions include encouraging self-initiation and self-motivation, establishing a strong, trusting manager-employee relationship from a distance; open and honest communication with critical information reported and shared concisely and regularly; and the appropriate handling of conflict. 

Mathematics for Operators
TRE 2052-99-11:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
Mathematic applications are used daily by operators when managing processes in their treatment plants.  This course will provide/refresh basic math skills that will assist the water treatment, wastewater treatment, water distribution and wastewater collection system operators in preparation for the Operator Certification examination.  Basic math skills including addition, subtraction, multiplication and division will be required to successfully pass this course.  Review topics will include:  ratios and proportions, solving for unknowns, linear measurements, area measurements and volume calculations.  Specific examples of these math applications as they apply to utility system operations will be provided.  Each participant should bring a calculator to this class.

Mathematics Skill Building I
TRE 1709-98-04:  All Operators (Non-Process)
14 hours
New and experienced operators will benefit from a mathematical review of concepts related to water and wastewater.  This course is designed to provide operators with problem solving skills. Practical problem solving topics will include conversion formulas, direct proportions, area calculations and volume calculations. Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to select correct conversion values for conversion formulas; solve for one unknown; set up equations for work related word problems; and, calculate operational problems, such as flow quantity, effluent treatment, and sludge volume.  Each participant must bring a calculator to this course.

Mathematics Skill Building II
TRE 1710-98-04:  All Operators (Non-Process)
14 hours
Participants will review skills taught in the Mathematics Skill Building 1 course.  Math problems derived from typical work situations will be covered.  Operations with specific water and wastewater formulas, with an emphasis on setting up and solving word problems, will be stressed. Mathematics Skill Building I is the recommended pre-requisite.  Please register early; class size is limited to 15 participants.  Each participant must bring a calculator to this course.

Mechanical Maintenance and the Operator
TRE 6018-16-11: All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
This training is designed to provide operators with a greater understanding of mechanical maintenance and the effect it has on process operations. The course will identify how maintenance activities directly affect process control and the effects that poor maintenance can have on the ability to properly treat wastewater and drinking water. During the course we will discuss common tools and equipment that are utilized in effective equipment maintenance and troubleshooting to help identify items that should be in every operator’s tool kit. We will also cover predictive maintenance technology and its applications to water and wastewater treatment equipment, including thermography, vibration analysis, and proper lubrication.

Meeting Nutrient (Phosphorous and Nitrogen) Removal Standards
TRE 4854-10-12:  WW All, IWW All (Process)
7 hours
Various options and operating practices currently used and available for removing nutrients from wastewater will be covered in this course.  Biological technologies will be addressed as to the ease (or difficulty) and cost of nutrient removal.  The effluent concentration required will be discussed as to the appropriateness of enhanced nutrient removal (ENR) techniques used to remove TN to less than 3.0 mg/l and TP to less than 0.3 mg/l.  The importance of methanol addition or another carbon source will be fully discussed as a food source for denitrifying organisms.  Metal salt addition and effluent filtration for phosphorus removal will be presented.  Nutrient removal regulations pertinent to protecting the Chesapeake Bay will also be discussed.  Finally, operational issues related to TN and TP removal will be summarized along with recommended corrections.

Membrane Filtration and Fluoridation Technologies
TRE 4072-07-07:  All Operators (Process)
7 hours
Membrane filtration and fluoridation technologies will be explored in this one-day course.  Discussion will include an up-close look at the membrane filtration treatment methods.  Membrane processes and parameters will be introduced followed by operational and maintenance techniques.  The uses of membrane filters to remove fluoride will be discussed in depth.  Participants will review fluoride applications and the evaluation methods used for determining performance.  The operator will also review safe handling techniques of fluoride and review how to properly store this treatment agent.  Actual facilities will be topics of classroom discussion and demonstrations.

Microbiology in Wastewater Treatment 
TRE 5613-14-12:  WW All; IWW All (Process)
7 hours
Wastewater operators will obtain improved process control through microscopic examination of mixed liquors and other waste streams.  The basics of microbiology will feature techniques to troubleshoot activated sludge problems and control strategy.  All participants will be introduced to the microscope features and benefits, the microscope selection process, and cost factors.  Time will be spent to familiarize the participants with the proper use and care of a microscope.  The course includes an overview of microscopic evaluations, sampling, flocculation, filaments, toxicity, overall health, slide preparation, maintenance, staining techniques, and sample examination.  The course will also cover organism identification and the effects of the presence, absence, mobility, and organism type on water and wastewater process control.  

MS Excel for BNR/ENR Reporting
TRE 4137-07-12:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
Experienced wastewater operators and superintendents learn how to use Microsoft Excel as a process tool by incorporating spreadsheets into their daily operation.  Participants will be introduced to templates formatted with process flags, process notes, process calculations, process charts and DMRs that are automatically completed using operator-entered data.  Participants will also be shown how to modify templates to incorporate their own routines.  Participants must have a working knowledge of Microsoft Excel.  Participants are encouraged to bring a copy of their NPDES permit and a flash drive so they can take their work with them. 

Municipal/Industrial Fats, Oils and Grease (FOG) Program Fundamentals 
TRE 4853-10-12:  WC All, IWW All (Non-Process)
7 hours
The fundamental aspects of a fats, oils, and grease program will be the focus of this course.  The production, treatment, capture and disposal of fats, oils, and grease as well as the basic and advanced administrative procedures utilized by various sized utilities will be covered.  The course will also provide perspectives and challenges facing the food service industry, grease abatement installation and maintenance contractors, collection system personnel, wastewater treatment plant personnel, and regulators at local, state and federal levels.  Illustrations of basic and advanced removal system sand programs found nationwide will be presented as well as individual case studies that are applicable and/or current for the audience on hand.  Public and private wastewater system professionals and FOG Inspectors, as well as restaurant owners/managers, grease disposal hauling firm personnel and regulators at any level will benefit from this general course.

National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit Reporting
TRE 6027-17-01:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Process)
7 hours
The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States.  This one-day course is designed to train wastewater operators and superintendents on the NPDES reporting process in Maryland.  The following topics will be covered: general objectives of the discharge reporting system, proper identification of excessive discharges, required methods for reporting to regulatory agencies, and the accurate preparation of monthly Discharge Monitoring Reports.  Dissolved oxygen, chlorine residual, pH tests, and flow monitoring will also be discussed. 
Each participant must bring to this course a calculator with a log function and a copy of his or her plant's Discharge Permit.  Please register early; this class is limited to 15 participants. 

NetDMR 
TRE 5432-13-08:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
NetDMR is a national tool for regulated Clean Water Act permittees to submit discharge monitoring reports (DMRs) electronically via a secure Internet application to U.S. EPA through the Environmental Information Exchange Network.  NetDMR allows participants to discontinue mailing in hard copy forms under 40 CFR 122.41 and 403.12.  MDE and MCET are partnering to deliver a one-day course to assist NPDES permittees required to submit DMRs via a secure Internet connection.  Attendees will be given signatory roles in the test environment of NetDMR.  They will be provided with over-the-shoulder assistance and upon completion of this course will have access to the production environment of NetDMR.  Only a signatory can be authorized to initiate the production environment of NetDMR.  
Limited Seating - One Representative per Facility.

NSC First Aid, CPR, and AED  
TRE 2835-03-06:  All Categories, All Classes (Non-Process)
7 hours
This National Safety Council First Aid, CPR, and AED course is designed to provide participants with critical skills and knowledge to respond to and manage an emergency situation that can save a life.  Course topics include:  assessing the scene of an emergency, establishing the condition of a victim, infection control, and the latest guidelines for CPR and emergency cardiac care.  Participants will work with a manikin to practice one-rescuer CPR and rescue breathing, use of an AE, and techniques for managing choking.  Participants will also be introduced to first aid basics, including the treatment of medical emergencies and injuries and other techniques that they may need until emergency medical services arrive.  Upon successful completion, participants will receive a National Safety Council First Aid CPR, and AED course completion card, valid for two years.

Ohm's Law & Circuit Analysis
TRE 5973-16-09, All Operators (Non-Process)
7 Hours
This electrical course is designed to introduce operators to basic electrical quantities including: voltage, current, resistance and power, measuring instruments, symbols, unit of measurements and care of measurements. Topics covered will include: Ohm’s Law, Watt’s Law and Kirchhoff’s Law for Series and parallel circuits, and troubleshooting various electrical circuits. Real world examples will be used to complete calculations related to Ohm’s Law, Watt’s Law and Kirchhoff’s Law. An overview of troubleshooting techniques for pumps, motors, and controls will also be covered.

OSHA 10-Hour Construction
TRE 2262-01-03:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process) 
10 hours
Orienting new personnel or serving as a refresher to construction safety and health standards, this course will provide an overview for participants on areas of construction safety and the OSHA guideline 29 CFR – 1926, Safety and Health Regulations for Construction.  Topics discussed will include an introduction to OSHA, with an overview of the OSHA standards including the Focus Four: Fall Hazards; Caught-In or –Between Hazards; Struck-by Hazards; and Electrocution Hazards. Other topics may include:  Toxic and Hazardous Substances; Stairways and Ladders; Scaffolding; Competent Person Requirements; Personal Protective Equipment (PPE); Hand and Power Tools; Lockout/Tagout; Signs, Signals and Barricades; Confined Space Entry; and Lift Truck Safety.

OSHA 30-Hour Construction 
TRE 5030-11-12:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process) 
30 hours
OSHA regulations as they relate to the construction industry will be covered in this course.  This training is for workers responsible for safety and covers safety and health hazards workers may face on construction work sites.  This course contains complete information about OSHA standards and the regulations covered under OSHA 29 CFR 1926.  Upon successful completion of this course, students receive the OSHA completion card from the Department of Labor.

Phosphorus Removal
TRE 104-85-11:  WW All (Process)
7 hours
To protect the Chesapeake Bay, phosphorus removal is required at Maryland wastewater treatment plants.  Enhanced levels or additional removal of phosphorus may be required in newly issued discharge permits.  This course will explain how phosphorus, as a nutrient, adversely affects the Chesapeake Bay and how phosphorus can be removed to less than 0.1 mg/l using physical, chemical and biological methods.  Use of iron and aluminum salts, their competing reactions with ortho-phosphorus and alkalinity, best chemical addition points, and common application methods will be thoroughly discussed.  This course will also explain how reducing phosphorus at the source through phosphate detergent bans has been a great benefit to WWTPs.  Finally, the course will provide the benefits of biological uptake of phosphorus and how to maximize this effect using modern day Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) process to minimize chemical addition and the costs and sludge generation associated with chemical addition.

Plant Optimization    
TRE 5704-15-04:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Process)
7 hours
In this time of increasing budget constraints, the operator (superintendent) needs to have some tools available for cost cutting and process optimization while still meeting all permit parameters.  Students will study example budgets, learn how to minimize energy use and costs, develop methods to minimize chemical use and costs, and examine how labor and contract costs contribute to budget expenditures.  Students should bring a process flow diagram from their facility (or be prepared to draw one).  If a line item budget from the student's facility is available, students should also bring that to class.

PLCs for Non-Programmers
TRE 6220-17-08: WWC; WD (Non-Process)
7 hours
Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) are robust industrial computers that contain hardware and software used to perform control functions in most automation industries. In the water and wastewater industries, PLCs are the brain behind gathering, execution and processing of data at remote stations including lift stations, water distribution tanks and pressure reducing stations. At the end of this course, non PLC programmers will understand the importance of PLC in process control and industrial automation, architecture of PLC, internal processes, communication in PLC, and basic understanding of Ladder Logic language.

Powered Industrial Trucks
7 hours
Each year, tens of thousands of forklift injuries occur in U.S. workplaces, often with fatalities.  During this program, participants will be introduced to the OSHA standard, 29 CFR 1910.178, Powered Industrial Trucks; an in-depth discussion of operator training requirements; safe operation of forklifts and safe work practices; forklift training program implementation; and, requirements related to fire protection, design, maintenance, truck operations, traveling and loading, maintenance, and fueling.

PPE and Respiratory Protection Training
TRE 1954-99-06:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
Operators who are involved with chlorine, use personal protective equipment, and need respiratory protection will benefit from this course.  Standard guidelines for daily operations and emergencies will be discussed.  Topics covered will include chlorine characteristics, 1-ton cylinders, proper operation and handling of chemicals, emergency response procedures, stand-by chemical use, and first aid for chemical contact.  Correct selection, use, care, and storage of PPE following OSHA standards also will be covered.  The respiratory protection training is for personnel working at sites with potentially hazardous contaminated air and is designed to provide the knowledge and skills needed to use personal protective equipment with minimal risk to their health and safety as required under OSHA Rule 1910.134.  Course content will include hazardous atmospheres, respirator types, proper fit testing, and respirator care. 

Preliminary Treatment Processes for Wastewater    
TRE 5804-15-11:  WW All; IW All; WC (Process)
7 hours
This class will identify and characterize the preliminary treatment processes used in wastewater treatment.  These pretreatment processes are all designed to protect the downstream equipment and treatment systems.  The processes include screening, grinding, grit removal, flow equalization, odor/corrosion control and flow measurement.  The class will review the safety concerns and protective measure related to these processes.  Indicators of process efficiencies, math concepts and regulatory issues are also addressed.  Participants are encouraged to describe their own experiences in this area, including examples of successful troubleshooting and corrective actions in class discussions.

Preparing Water Operators for the Class 1 and Class 2 Certification Exams 
TRE 5130-12-06:  All WT (Non-Process)
7 hours
Let us help you, the entry level water operator, study for and pass the State of Maryland Class 1 and 2 Certification Exams.  This examination preparatory class provides a fundamental discussion of drinking water operations, including a math refresher with conversion factors and formulas used to solve treatment plant problems related to flows, chlorination, and chemical addition.  Discussion items include ground and surface water sources; and source water conservation, quality, and protection as related to drinking water treatment and distribution.  The major water treatment emphasis is on disinfection and pH adjustment.  Other topics covered include:  disinfection; pH adjustment for corrosion control; sampling procedures; and overview of coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation and filtration; safety; and good housekeeping.

Preventing Workplace Violence
TRE 2458-02-04:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
Violence in the workplace is a serious public health problem.  This course is intended to show both operators and superintendents how to deal effectively with potentially volatile situations.  This session will focus on the employee’s role in helping to prevent violence in the workplace and ways to diffuse violent situations.  Participants will be introduced to the stages of violent behavior; preventive measures; warning signs of workplace violence; security-conscious thinking; and measures required to take action. 

Preventive Maintenance Management 
TRE 1100-94-10:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
Preventive maintenance programs can be implemented at water and wastewater treatment facilities to help plant personnel better anticipate, plan for, and implement maintenance tasks that may prevent unnecessary equipment failures.  In this course, the many benefits and functional aspects of a preventive maintenance program are discussed, and instruction is given on compiling operations and maintenance library, a spare parts inventory, and a work order system.  A major component of the course consists of exercises designed to develop the participants’ practical skills in designing and managing a preventive maintenance program.

Process and Performance Troubleshooting
TRE 3887-06-11:  WW All; IW All; WC All (Process)
7 hours
Intermediate and advanced operators responsible for investigating and troubleshooting process and performance control problems will benefit from this program.  Wastewater treatment facilities without original standards or with out-of-date standards would benefit from these troubleshooting tools.  Course topics include:  continuous flow activated sludge treatment facilities with and without biological nutrient removal capabilities, discussions and illustrations for design and performance standards commonly used to evaluate wastewater treatment units and processes, and workgroup discussions and evaluations of a wastewater treatment units and processes including recommendations and findings.  The course will require the use of calculators for several formulas used for troubleshooting and evaluating process performance.

Process Control for Operators
TRE 4668-09-09:  WW All; IW All (Process)
7 hours
This course is intended for intermediate level operators working at activated sludge wastewater treatment plants of all sizes and types.  Operational parameters and design standards normally used for process control and troubleshooting will be discussed, along with how they are used to evaluate and monitor treatment units and processes.  Participants will be given worksheets for calculating PPD loadings, F/M, sludge age, and MCRT along with several process control examples to complete in class.  During the last part of the class, participants will be divided into teams to complete at least two process control assignments using the tools and skills taught earlier in the class.  Nutrient removal will be discussed, but the focus will be on utilizing operational parameters and design standards for process control.  The course will cover flow-through and batch processing activated sludge treatment processes.  Participants are encouraged to discuss actual plant problems or know case studies.  Each participant should bring a calculator to this class.

Process Management through Chemical Resource Conservation
TRE 3818-06-07:  All Operators (Process)
7 hours
Process management and chemical resource conservation allow operators to measure dosages while limiting the amount of chemicals used.  The operator will explore common dosage mistakes and implement corrective measures.  Dosage processes such as chemical feed, strength, pump calibration, product verification and residual measurements will be covered.

Public Utility Leader
TRE 5908-16-05, All Operators; All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
The traditional definition of leadership is evolving in today’s multi-generational and multi-cultural workplace. Whether you are an operator, team leader, or superintendent this course will give you the tools and skills needed to be successful in leading others in a diverse workforce. Participants will learn the difference between a leader and a manager; how to effectively delegate work and set realistic goals and expectations; how to document performance and provide constructive feedback. Other topics will include performance evaluation dos and don’ts and how to reward and recognize good performance.

Pump Hydraulics 
TRE 4197-08-04:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
Pump hydraulics is vital to anyone who must operate, maintain and troubleshoot water and wastewater pumping systems.  This class will provide the student a basic understanding of the hydraulic principles related to centrifugal pumps.  Subjects covered:  hydraulic formulas and volumetric calculations, the properties of water at rest and in motion, and the hydraulic forces that exist in a pumping system.  Each participant should bring a scientific calculator to this class.

Pumps, Motors, and Controls 
TRE 5026-11-12:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
Appropriate operations of the pumps and their maintenance are critical to keeping water and wastewater systems up and running daily.  This training will give the participant an introduction to the theory and operation of the various pumps used in water and wastewater systems.  In addition to an overview of basic pump hydraulics and pumping systems, there will be discussions on centrifugal pump operation, components, maintenance and troubleshooting.

Reading Blueprints and Plans for the Water and Wastewater Industry
TRE 4096-07-09:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
Water and wastewater personnel are often required to read and interpret a variety of plans, blueprints and flow charts to aid them in performing maintenance, fine-tune treatment processes or simply to review and comment on proposed construction.  Participants will become familiarized with how to use the architectural, mechanical, engineering and electrical drawings commonly used in the water and wastewater treatment industry.  In addition, the students will use engineer and architect scales, review topographical and surveying maps, interpret piping and flow diagrams and prepare effective field sketches.

Reading Utility Drawings
TRE 4756-10-03:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
Operators of water and wastewater facilities are often required to read technical diagrams in the course of their work day.  This program, after introducing the concepts of what symbols mean and how they are used in conveying technical information, will show participants how the general principles are applied.  Topics include technical diagrams, and electrical, fluid power, air conditioning, and welding diagrams.

Respiratory Protection Training
TRE 2671-02-11:  All Operators (Non-Process) 
7 hours
Water and wastewater personnel need a working knowledge and the necessary skills to use, care and select personal protective equipment (PPE) as required under OSHA Standard 1910.134.  This course will discuss hazardous atmospheres, respirator types, proper fit testing, and respirator care.  After this course, the student should be able to recognize potentially hazardous atmospheres; define types of air-purifying respirators and air-supplying respirators; evaluate and select an air purifying respirator and cartridge; calculate protection factor (PF) and allowable concentration of contaminants relationships; list steps to proper respirator fit testing; and describe proper steps for cleaning, inspecting, and storing a respirator.

Safe Drinking Water Act - Federal Regulations   
TRE 3830-06-09:  WT 1-5 & G; WD; Superintendents WD (Process)
7 hours
The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) was established to protect public health by regulating the nation's public drinking water supply.  The SDWA authorizes the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) to set national health-based standards for drinking water to protect against both naturally-occurring and man-made contaminants that may be found in drinking water.  Working together, federal agencies, state agencies and water system personnel make sure that these standards are met.  This course will introduce water supply system personnel to the most recent SDWA revisions, including Maryland regulations, and the National Primary Drinking Water Regulations. Additionally, participants will review  the 1996 amendments which greatly enhanced the existing law by recognizing source water protection, operator training, funding for water system improvements, and public information as important components of safe drinking water.  Information about updated monitoring requirements, recordkeeping, emergency planning and response, and certification will be covered.  

SCADA Systems 
TRE 5738-15-06: All Operators (Process)
7 hours
This course is designed to show the participants how SCADA systems can be used to get the best performance out of water and sewer systems at the least cost. It will cover the parts of a SCADA system in general and show how they function and relate back to a site-specific wastewater treatment plant. It will include the use of remote reading water meters and how they can be used in conjunction with a SCADA system monitoring a water source and production system to reduce the amount of lost water and lower the cost of operation. It will also demonstrate how a SCADA system can be used to isolate I& I in a sewer collection system and how this can affect the plant’s operations. Finally, it will cover in detail the use of SCADA to control the process used in an ENR Wastewater Treatment Plant to meet the requirements of the NPDES permit, even during periods of changing flow, in great detail.

Screening Water and Wastewater for Safety, Security, and Toxicity 
TRE 5805-15-11:  All Operators (Process)
7 hours
The activated sludge process has limitations when handling toxic influents of unknown origin and strength.  Once the bug population is destroyed or inactivated due to toxicity or high BOD loading, regrowth is a painful, time consuming process.  Time is of the essence when this occurs, so an immediate screening of the process can provide real-time information for decision-making.  Simple screening tools will be discussed, such as: chemical oxygen demand tests, quick biological scans, rapid biological toxicity screening, and oxidation reduction potential (ORP).  Participants will also discuss how quick screens of key areas of their water system for safety and security vulnerabilities can be beneficial, examine how case-histories and low-cost ideas and applications can be used to monitor strategic areas of their water system and how these tools can be used as an early-warning mechanism to prevent disinfection residual violations, or assess the system for intrusions.  Monitoring system components, applications and integration from hardware to data acquisitions and transmission will also be covered.

Sludge Management
TRE 3831-06-09:  WW 1-6 S & A, Superintendents WW (Process)
7 hours
Various methods are used for thickening, stabilizing, conditioning, and dewatering wastewater treatment plant sludge.  Sludge types, primary, biological, chemical influence disposal options and the cost of sludge handling will be discussed and the appropriate thickening techniques (settling versus air flotation) will be reviewed.  Sludge stabilization will be stressed for disposal purposes; the use of chemical conditioning agents will be fully discussed; and the importance of dewatering techniques to reduce sludge hauling expenses.  Sludge disposal regulations also will be presented.

Small Water Systems
TRE 4302-08-06:  WT All (Process)
7 hours
Operators of small water systems will be introduced to various water treatment processes including raw water sources, treatment plant processes, and chemicals used.  Basic principles of plant operations, an in-depth examination of the disinfection process, including various forms of chlorine utilized in the water treatment field, will also be discussed.  The safe handling of chlorine and the safety features built into cylinders and feed equipment will also be addressed.

Solids Handling     
TRE 2007-99-08:  WW 2-6, S; IW 2,3,5,6,7; WT 3-5 (Process)
7 hours
Wastewater operators need to have practical knowledge for dealing with sludge thickening and dewatering.  In this course, students will analyze the characteristics of primary, secondary, and chemical sludge and the types of treatment processes used for each.  Topics covered will include gravity thickening, dissolved air floatation, centrifuge operation, gravity belt, and belt filter presses, and vacuum filters.  Each participant should bring a calculator to this course. 

Sources and Treatment of Water 
TRE 5339-13-02:  WT All; WD (Process)
7 hours
Water operators will explore water treatment for both the ground and surface facilities.  Students will be introduced to surface water source options and ground water wells and how they are constructed and maintained.  Other topics will include various treatment strategies such as Disinfection and Corrosion control, Iron and Manganese Removal, Arsenic and Organic removal.  Various water treatment chemicals and their feed systems will also be covered.

Stormwater Pollution Prevention 
TRE 4944-11-06:  All Operators (Non-Process) 
7 hours
Employee training is a required and an essential part of a Wastewater Treatment Plant Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP).  The primary focus of this course is to introduce the participant to the site assessment process, procedures for inspecting and monitoring site stormwater systems and best management practices (BMPs) for ensuring that stormwater pollutants from WWTPs are not making their way into Maryland's watersheds.  BMPs are standard operating procedures that can reduce the threats of stormwater pollution to water supplies.

Surface Water Treatment
TRE 3640-06-01:  WT All (Process)
7 hours
Water operators will explore water treatment for surface facilities. Operators will be introduced to the concepts, treatment components, process control, and troubleshooting related to the major components of a typical surface water treatment plant.  Coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, and filtration will be covered in detail, including the "optimization goals" of each process.  Instruction and practice in solving typical operational and mathematical problems associated with these treatment functions will also be included.

Surviving a MOSH Compliance Inspection  
TRE 5614-14-12:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
Comply with workplace health and safety rules and avoid safety violations by maintaining a workplace free of hazards.  This class is designed for superintendents, managers, and operators of water/wastewater facilities who have a duty to provide a safe workplace.  You will review the Maryland Occupational Safety and Health (MOSH) standards as applied to the utility sector.  An overview of the compliance inspection process will be covered from the initial "knock at the door" by MOSH to the closing conference.  Focus will be on the most commonly found safety and health violations in the utility sector and how they tie back to OSHA's "Top 10" list of violations.  This class will include exercises in hazard identification and how to perform a Workplace Hazard Assessment.

Teams, Teamwork and Team Building 
TRE 4367-08-12:  All Operators, All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
People in our workplaces talk about building the team, working as a team, and ‘my team’, but do they know how to be part of a successful team? Effective Team Building will help improve your team’s communication, connection, and effectiveness. Efforts will be directed toward problem solving, task effectiveness, and maximizing the use of all members' resources to achieve the team's purpose.

Technical Writing for Utility Managers
TRE 1736-98-05:  All Operators,  All Superintendents (Non-Process)
7 hours
Effective writing skills enable utility managers to prepare clear and concise budget justifications and other written presentations to mayors and/or councils who fund their facilities.  Specific topics of this course include: formal versus informal writing; organizing budget planning documents and proposals; and written budget justification presentations.

Technical Writing for Water and Wastewater Operators
TRE 1800-98-08:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
Utility managers will gain skills that will enhance their writing, enabling them to prepare clear and concise budget justifications and other written presentations to mayors and/or councils who fund their facilities.  Specific topics include:  formal versus informal writing; organizing budget planning documents and proposals; and written budget justification presentations.

Thermal Controls in Water/Wastewater Processes
TRE 3817-06-07:  All Operators (Process)
7 hours
Chlorination, fluoridation, corrosion, chemical feed, activated sludge, BNR, laboratory/field sampling, including pumps, motors and control centers are affected by thermal changes.  This course will review the thermal controls in water and wastewater processes and the importance of calibration and traceability protocols of the thermometer.

Thermal Drying and Pelletizing Biosolids  
TRE 5806-15-11:  WW All; IW All (Non-Process)
7 hours
Heat drying and pelletization is a process which removes water from biosolids through evaporation.  The implementation of thermal drying and pelletizing can greatly reduce a facilities cost for biosolids disposal.  This course offers an introduction to thermal drying and pelletizing by discussing four different thermal drying technologies and the advantages and disadvantages of each.  Regulatory requirements and limitations that are required to operate a biosolids dryer/pelletizer will be discussed.  Composting bio-solids and alternative process to thermal drying will also be covered.

Tips and Tools for 21st Century Water/Wastewater Process Monitoring
TRE 2189-00-10:  All Operators (Process) 
7 hours
To maintain the water/wastewater treatment process at peak operational performance, operators can effectively utilize simplified on-site monitoring tools and techniques.  This interactive course examines reduction/oxidation (redox) and simple alkalinity monitoring as tools that enable the operator to assess current operational conditions, identify problem areas, and make operational changes.  This course also covers simplified monitoring methods for nutrient measurements and residuals measurement such as fluoride, pH, and dissolved oxygen.

Troubleshooting Pumps    
TRE 190-86-09:  All Operators (Non-Process) 
7 hours
Operators will be introduced to the basic troubleshooting skills needed when a centrifugal pump shows signs of failure.  The course includes a review of basic hydraulic terminology and component functionality.  Additionally, a study of a typical pump curve and a discussion of water, brake and motor horsepower will provide the operator with a background in centrifugal pumps and their operating principles.  Troubleshooting typical centrifugal pump problems based on given symptoms will be covered in detail.

Ultraviolet Disinfection
TRE 3889-06-11:  All Operators (Process)
7 hours
Ultraviolet disinfection (UV) techniques and applications are used for both potable water and wastewater systems.  Operations personnel will discuss the advantages of ultraviolet disinfection systems compared to typical chemical disinfection systems like chlorine or ozone.  Course topics will include: how UV is used for controlling giardia and cryptosporidium in potable waters; defining UV; how it differs from other oxidizer-based disinfection systems including the disadvantages; and why UV is a low-cost choice for installation, operation, and maintenance.  The student will benefit by reviewing the appropriate applications in community and non-community potable waters and wastewater systems.

Unidirectional Flushing Program Design
TRE 2456-02-04:  WT All; WD (Non-Process)
7 hours
Unidirectional flushing is a maintenance technique used to ensure good water quality while exposing problems in a water distribution system.  This course is intended to prepare distribution system superintendents and lead operators in establishing and conducting a unidirectional flushing program for their distribution systems.  Subjects covered include basic distribution system hydraulics, flushing program objectives, tool and equipment requirements, valve and hydrant operation, flushing program design, dechlorination criteria, data collection, customer relations, and flushing problem solving.  Upon completion of this course, participants should be able to list and explain the major components of a flushing program; explain the flushing process as it relates to physical requirements, field operations, and dechlorination requirements and techniques; define the administrative and customer relations requirements of a flushing program; and analyze problems in systems in order to develop solutions.

Valves
TRE 4865-11-01:  All Operators (Non-Process)
7 hours
Distribution operators will receive the basic knowledge necessary to identify and maintain many of the valves used in a water distribution system.  Topics include: different types of distribution system valves and their uses; proper valve operation methods; basic valve maintenance; and troubleshooting and proper installation techniques.

Verifying the Water and Wastewater Process
TRE 4301-08-06:  All Operators (Process)
7 hours
When it comes to process management, choosing the best verification protocol is all about selecting the appropriate method.  This program reviews the selection process by looking at the various methods operators can choose to obtain information for daily reports, process management and even process control.  Protocols will be addressed to let operators choose the between the best selection methods for water/wastewater quality.  Six verification methods will be addressed, Gravimetric, Colorimetric, Titrimetric, Turbimetric, Electrometric and Nepelometric methods.

Wastewater Certification Examination Prep
TRE 6222-17-08: All WW; IWW (Non-Process)
7 hours
Operators often struggle when preparing for their certification exam. This course is designed to assist them in their effort to prepare for their wastewater certification exam and includes a basic overview on general wastewater treatment principles including regulations, nutrient removal, treatment processes, disinfection, wastewater sources, activated sludge, filtration, and pumps; and test taking strategies. Operators will take a practice examination and then break down each question to better understand test taking strategies and material.  If you are preparing to take the State of Maryland wastewater certification exams, this class will equip you with the tools you need to study and get ready for those tests. Each participant must bring a calculator to this course.

Wastewater Collection Systems Operations and Maintenance    
TRE 5705-15-04:  WW All, IWW All, WWC; WW, IWW, and WWC Superintendents (Non-Process)
14 hours
The new and experienced collection system worker will be provided with a comprehensive overview of collection system theory, construction, operation and maintenance.  Topics covered will include: the purpose, design and construction of wastewater collection systems; the environmental impact of a poorly functioning collection system; the worker's role is in its operation and maintenance; the methods used in maintaining and repairing collection system components.

Wastewater Operations, Monitoring, and Process Control at an Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant  
TRE 5436-13-10:   All WW, IWW (Process)
14 hours
This two-day class provides a comprehensive discussion of all aspects of municipal wastewater treatment operations and maintenance, including a wastewater mathematics refresher.  The class will address basic conversion factors and formulas used to solve treatment plant problems related to flows, grit channels, sedimentation tanks and clarifiers, trickling filters, activated sludge, chlorination, and chemical doses.  All treatment operations and maintenance, laboratory sampling, and solids handling topics and provides the operators with study material and trouble-shooting guides necessary to prepare for certification exams will be addressed.  Topics covered will include screening; primary clarification; biological secondary treatment-activated sludge, trickling filters, package plants, and oxidation ditches; advanced treatment for nutrient removal; media and membrane filtration; chlorination and ultraviolet light irradiation; solids thickening, digestion, dewatering, and disposal; plant safety; and good housekeeping.  If you are preparing to take the State of Maryland wastewater certification exams class 5 or 5A, this class will equip you with the tools you need to study and get ready for those tests.  Each participant must bring a calculator to this course.

Wastewater Treatment - Nutrient Removal
TRE 6022-16-11: All WW; All IWW (Process)
7 hours
Wastewater treatment systems take human and industrial liquid wastes and make them safe enough, from the public health perspective, to return to the aquatic environment. Forms of nitrogen and phosphorus nitrification and denitrification, chemical and biological phosphorus removal, alkalinity adjustment, supplemental carbon sources, process testing, control and permit compliance will all be discussed in detail. The effluent concentration required will be discussed as to the appropriateness of enhanced nutrient removal (ENR) techniques used to remove TN to less than 3.0 mg/l and TP to less than 0.3 mg/l. Optimizing operations for year-round effluent performances will be discussed for both nitrogen and phosphorus removal. Operational issues related to TN and TP removal will be identified along with recommended corrections.

Water and Wastewater Disinfection Alternatives
TRE 4068-07-07:  All Operators (Process)
7 hours
Small water and wastewater system operators will learn about chlorine and its alternatives for the primary disinfection of drinking water and treated wastewater.  These alternatives may reduce disinfection by-products and eliminate the need for dechlorination.  The course will describe the key criteria for disinfectant selection, including cost, safety, maintainability, control, and monitoring considerations.  Also presented are the pros and cons of chlorine dioxide and chloramines as alternatives to help reduce disinfection by-products and the benefits and features of alternative disinfectants like ozone, ultraviolet, mixed oxidant systems, and peroxide.  The course includes a look at the various laboratory methods to determine residuals and demonstrations of some of the practical simplified test protocols.  Finally, some class time is devoted to hands-on practice of a number of residual test methods.

Water Distribution System Examination Preparation
TRE 6023-16-11: WT 4; WWC; WD (Non-Process)
7 hours
Are you preparing to take your water distribution certification exam? Operators often struggle when preparing for their certification exam. This course is designed to assist you in your effort to prepare for your water distribution certification exam. Subjects covered include: test-taking and studying techniques; basic math review; calculating volumes; chemical calculations; basic pump operation and components; and distribution system basics. Operators learn to analyze and solve problems when they occur and perform mathematical calculations commonly associated with operating a distribution system. Participants should bring a calculator to this course.

Water Distribution Systems Operations and Maintenance    
TRE 5706-15-04:  WT All; WD; WT and WD Superintendents (Non-Process)
14 hours
Water distribution operators are required to have knowledge of practical aspects of operating and maintaining water distribution systems and emphasizing safe practices and procedures.  Topics covered in this course include the role and duties of water distribution system operators, procedures for operating and maintaining clear wells and storage tanks, components and characteristics of distribution system facilities, operating and maintaining distribution systems, maintaining water quality in the system, disinfecting new and repaired facilities as well as water delivered to consumers, and techniques for recognizing hazards and developing safe procedures and programs.  Operators learn to analyze and solve problems when they occur and perform mathematical calculations commonly associated with operating a distribution system.

Water Filtration 
TRE 5079-12-03:  All Operators (Process)
7 hours
Operators will examine the different methods of filtration, the types of filters and their component used in a water system, the pretreatment process and common components associated with granular media filters.  They will also learn about optimizing their filtration performance and the techniques of evaluating the filter beds to recognize problems before they occur.  Evaluation techniques for water filtration will include taking freeboard measurements, obtaining a top layer gravel footprint, measuring filter rise rate during backwash, and performing floc retention analysis to determine how effective your backwash is at cleaning your filter media.

Water Operations, Monitoring, and Process Control at Class 3 and Class 4 Water Treatment Plants 
TRE 5549-14-05:  WT All (Process)
14 hours
This two-day class provides a comprehensive discussion of all aspects of municipal water treatment operations and maintenance, including water mathematics.  The class will address basic conversion factors and formulas used for process control and used to solve treatment plant problems related to clarification, gravity filtration, chlorination, and chemical dosing.  Topics covered will include:  surface water treatment, groundwater treatment, and the particular parameters that dictate successful treatment of both water sources.  All treatment operations and maintenance, laboratory sampling, and residuals handling topics will be discussed.  Attendees will be introduced to in-depth concepts and practices related to conventional water treatment processes, basic sampling and laboratory skills, and management and supervisory skills.  This is a worthwhile class for any operator looking to take the next step in their career ladder as a lead operator or plant manager, while those preparing the State of Maryland Class 3 and Class 4 Drinking Water Treatment Plant Operator exam or higher level operator certification examination will also find it beneficial.

Water Storage and Distribution Systems 
TRE 5049-12-02 WT All; WD (Process)
7 hours
How is water stored and then distributed by water systems?  Operations and maintenance of gravity storage and hydropneumatic tanks will be reviewed.  Distribution system topics will include an evaluation of components, basic design, construction and repairs, hydraulic concepts, flushing, valve exercising, pressure testing programs, water quality monitoring, cross-connection identification and control, and safe work practices.  This training is designed to prepare individuals for certification and licensure as well as renewal of licenses and certification in the water/wastewater industry.

Water Storage, Distribution, and Pumps
TRE 6024-16-11: All WT; WWC; WD (Non-Process)
7 hours
To be successful in the water distribution field, operators need experience and training in the practical aspects of operating and maintaining water distribution systems, while emphasizing safe practices and procedures. This course will discuss typical distribution system process components from treatment to delivery. Water quality monitoring including sample type, collection and minimum/maximum concentrations are discussed. Topics will include pumping, storage, valves, and distribution O&M and the principal role of each component in the distribution network. A brief review of the safety standards pertaining to confined space entry, trench safety, and lockout/tagout will be addressed following the process discussion.

Water Treatment - Compliance and Safety
TRE 5818-15-12:  WT All, WD (Process)
7 hours
How does compliance and safety impact the daily routine of water system operators? This course provides participants a wide variety of compliance related topics including: the induction and compliance of the Safe Drinking Water Act; proper sampling procedures and associated regulations; operator certification requirements; MDE permits and reporting; proper operator recordkeeping; and both OSHA and EPA requirements.  These important topics have been compiled for the beginning operator as well as the experienced operator/manager.

Water Treatment–Chlorine Use and Safety
TRE 1613-97-09:  WT All; WD (Process) 
7 hours
The various water treatment processes including raw water sources, treatment plant processes, chemicals used, and basic principles of plant operations are the focus of this course.  An in-depth examination of the disinfection process, including the various forms of chlorine utilized in the water treatment field will also be discussed.  Topics covered will include jar testing, chlorine analysis, and chemicals used in the treatment process.  The safe handling of chlorine and the safety features built into cylinders and feed equipment will also be covered.

Well Systems - An Introduction to Operation and Maintenance 
TRE 1099-94-10:  WT All; WD (Process)
7 hours
This course is intended for superintendents and operators of public water systems that utilize groundwater wells as a source of supply.  Topics to be covered include groundwater hydrogeology; types of wells and drilling techniques; well pumps, motors, and control systems; well pump station design; operational strategies; well maintenance and rehabilitation alternatives; water quality monitoring; performance monitoring and troubleshooting; and sanitary risks and protection.